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tv   Democracy Now  PBS  July 8, 2016 12:00pm-1:01pm PDT

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07/08/16 07/08/16 [captioning made possible by democracy now!] amy: from pacifica, this is democracy now! pres. obama: we still do not know all of the facts. what we do know is there has been a vicious, calculated, and despicable attack on law enforcement. amy: in dallas, texas, five police officers have been shot dead, six others injured after they were ambushed while patrolling a protest against police violence. no information has been released about the suspected shooter's. though, what is debt. this comes days after shocking video showed police officers
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killing african-american men in baton rouge, louisiana, and falcon heights, minneapolis. pres. obama: incidents like this there is a big chunk of our fellow citizenry that feels because of the color of their skin, they're not being treated the same. amy: we will speak with a retired new york police attacked up as well as the head of the naacp in baton rouge, and the .uthor marc lamont hill then we look at a stunning expose into the privatized world of prison extradition in which prisoners are transferred across the country by for-profit van companies. all of that and more coming up. welcome to democracy now!,
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democracynow.org, the war and peace report. i'm amy goodman. in dallas, five police officers have been shot dead and six .thers were wounded the police were patrolling a demonstration in downtown dallas against the recent police shootings of alton sterling in baton rouge, louisiana, and philando castile in falcon heights, minnesota. video of the men being killed by police have sparked protests across the nation. authorities in dallas described her states assault as a planned ambush. authorities have not yet released information on the suspected shooters. the gunfire erupted around it: 40 5 p.m. local time, just as the peaceful protest was wrapping up. four the slain officers worked for the dallas police department. the third best it was part of the dallas area rapid transit force known as dart.
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at least one protester was injured in the shooting. one of the suspected snipers reportedly died from a self-inflicted gunshot. three other people have been taken into custody. earlier this morning, president obama spoke in warsaw where he is attending the nato summit. pres. obama: these law enforcement officers were targeted and nearly a dozen officers were shot. five were killed. at least one wounded civilian. we are praying for the recovery. obama speaking in warsaw. no information has been released about this is a good shooter s. as of may, more than 70% of police killed this year were killed by white men. as news about the dallas shooting unfolded, former illinois congressman joe walsh sparked controversy by declaring a war against president obama and black lives matter activists. around 9:00 p.m. last night,
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walsh tweeted -- "3 dallas cops killed. 7 wounded. this is now war. watch out obama. watch out black lives matter punks. real america is coming after you." he later deleted the tweet. this comes as many commentators are inaccurately claiming there has been a rise in violence against police officers under the obama administration. in reali during the first seven years of obama's presidency, an average of 54 officers were shot and killed. that's less than the average of officers killed each year under presidents george w. bush, bill clinton, george h.w. bush, ronald reagan and gerald ford. , in fact, the safest two years for police officers over the last century were during the obama presidency. the years 2013 and 2015, which also coincided with the rise of the black lives matter movement. protests against police brutality are spreading across the country in the wake of the fatal police killings of african american men alton sterling in
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baton rouge, louisiana, and philando castile in falcon heights, minnesota. in oakland, california, more than 1000 people blocked interstate 880 for hours. hundreds more marched in denver, philadelphia, washington d.c., atlanta, and baton rouge. more than 40 people were arrested amid a massive march in new york city. in minnesota, thousands of people attended vigils for philando castile outside the montessori school where castile had worked, and outside the governor's mansion in st. paul, where his girlfriend, diamond "lavish" reynolds spoke out. >> they held me in a room. no water, no food. they took my phone. no numbers. i don't have my phone. they took over my facebook. they took my groceries. they took everything that i had at the time. and then they seized the car for evidence. they seized my phone for evidence.
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video,dy who share that they don't want you guys to be part of this. they don't want us to stand up for one another. they don't want us to support each other. they want everybody to stand up for them. they are going to temper with evidence. they are going to tamper with witnesses. they're going to do whatever they can to cover their butts. this is not acceptable. amy: that is diamond "lavish" reynolds, who livestreamed the video of the aftermath of her boyfriend's death. she narrated what happened from the car, livestreaming on facebook. the officer who fatally shot castile has been identified as 28-year-old jeronimo yanez. a second cop at the scene has been identified as officer joseph kauser. both officers are currently on paid leave. on thursday, minnesota governor mark dayton said the fatal shooting was motivated by racism. >> would this have happened if those passengers, the driver or passenger were white?
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i don't think it would have. i'm forced to confront -- and i think all of us are forced to confront this kind of racism exists. us, tooming up on all of vow to do whatever we can to see that it doesn't happen, that it doesn't continue to happen. amy: we'll have more on the fatal police killings of alton sterling in baton rouge, and philando castile in falcon heights as well as the shootings , in dallas, texas, after headlines. this comes as the fbi is investigating the case of a black man found hanging from a tree in piedmont park, atlanta, a fulton county medical examiner initially ruled the hanging a suicide, sparking outrage. atlanta mayor kasim reed then referred the case to the fbi. in new york city, ramsey orta, who filmed the police killing of eric garner is slated to go to jail for four years -- making him the only pson at the scene of eric garner's killing who will serve jail time.
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on wednesday, orta took a plea deal on weapons and drug charges. he says he has been repeatedly harassed and arrested by police since he filmed the video of the fatal police chokehold nearly two years ago. meanwhile, in baltimore, the fourth trial has begun for police offics charged in the death of freddie gray, who died after sustaining spinal injuries in police custody. officer brian rice is the highest-ranking officer to be tried so far. two of rice's fellow police officers have already been acquitted. fbi director james comey testified before congress thursday over the agency's decision to recommend no charges be brought against democratic presidential candidate hillary clinton over her use of multiple private e-mail servers while she was secretary of state. south carolina representative trey gowdy pressed comey on the discrepancies between hillary clinton's statements that none of the e-mails had been marked classified at the time they were sent and the fbi's findings. >> secretary clinton said there was nothing marked as a fight on
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her e-mails either sent or received. was that true? >> that is not true. there were a small number of portion markings have been gone three of the documents. >> secretary clinton's that i did not e-mail any classified material to anyone on my e-mail. there is no classified material. was that true? >> there was classified material e-mailed. amy: in news from the campaign trail, hillary clinton has announced a proposal to eliminate tuition at in-state public colleges and universities for families earning less than $125,000 a year. the proposal stops short of that of her rival, democratic presidential candidate bernie sanders, who has proposed making tuition at public universities free for all students. still, clinton's new position is seen as her largely embracing one of sanders' core issues in order to court sanders supporters, particularly younger voters. sanders is expected to give a formal endorsement of hillary clinton next week. in iraq, another suicide attack claimed by isis has killed at
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least 35 people near a shiite shrine north of baghdad. this comes as the death toll from this weekend's massive suicide truck bombing has risen to nearly 300 people. it was the deadliest attack in baghdad since the 2003 u.s.-led invasion. iraq's health undersecretary spoke out. >> the death toll from the bombing is 200 92. 115 were identified and delivered to relatives, while 177 others have not been identified yet. forensic officers are working day and night to identify the dead hotties in order to give them to their bereaved families. amy: this comes as former british prime minister tony blair has defended his position to push britain into the iraq war, claiming the world would be in an even worse position without the invasion of iraq that ousted saddam hussein. this comes after the release of the long-awaited chilcot report, which blames tony blair for deliberately exaggerating the
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threat posed by saddam hussein in the lead-up to the iraq war. the report also revealed blair had been warned multiple times by britain's joint intelligence committee that the invasion of iraq would increase the threat of terrorism by al qaeda and other militant groups. in brazil, lower house speaker eduardo cunha has resigned in tears amid an ongoing corruption investigation against him. he is one of the conservative lawmakers most responsible for orchestrating the impeachment of president dilma rousseff. she has called her suspension and impeachment a coup. in honduras, another activist from the indigenous rights organization copinh has been killed. 49-year-old lesbia janeth urquia was a mother of three and a member of copinh since the 2009 u.s.-backed military coup. she had been one of the leaders of a campaign against the construction of a privatized hydroelectric dam along a river in the region of la paz. her body was found near a
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garbage dump on wednesday. she had been stabbed to death. the daughter of murdered environmentalist and copinh leader berta caceres spoke out. great defender of mother earth was initially kidnapped. and we know this unofficially because there is no official version from the government. she was later found murdered with a blunt weapon and this coincides with the consultation that was going to take place on sunday. as coordinator of an organization, i was also planning to participate to say no to the construction of dams in la paz. amy: this comes as the u.s. says it's investigating reports by a former honduran soldier that berta caceres appeared on a hit list distributed to u.s.-trained special forces before her assassination. scientists have confirmed june was the hottest month ever recorded, making it the 14th
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straight month to smash global temperature records amid human-fueled climate change. this comes as the amount of arctic sea ice has hit an all time record low. scientists have confirmed that a vast stretch of ice, roughly twice the size of texas, has finished over the last three decades, and that the rate of the melting is accelerating. and in michigan, dozens of activists have protested and hung banners outside the house of michigan attorney general bill schuette to demand he move to shut down an aging oil pipeline known as line 5. a university of michigan study says hundreds of miles of michigan's shoreline would be at risk contamination if line 5 leaks. the pipeline is owned by enbridge, the company responsible for another massive pipeline break in 2010, which dumped about 800,000 gallons of crude oil into a tributary of the kalamazoo river. and those are some of the headlines. this is democracy now!, democracynow.org, the war and peace report. i'm amy goodman.
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in dallas, five police officers have been shot dead and six others wounded. the police were patrolling a demonstration in downtown dallas against the recent police shootings of alton sterling in baton rouge, louisiana, and philando castile in st. paul, minnesota. videos of the two african-american men being killed sparked protests across the nation. authorities in dallas described thursday's assault as a planned ambush. authorities have not yet released information on the suspected shooters. one of the suspected snipers reportedly died from a self-inflicted gunshot. three other people have been taken into custody. the gunfire erupted at around 8:45 p.m. local time just as the peaceful protest was wrapping up. four of the slain officers worked for the dallas police department, the fifth was part of the dallas area rapid transit force. he was a dart officer.
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at least one protester was injured in the shooting. earlier this morning president , obama spoke in warsaw where he is attending the nato summit. still do notwe know all of the facts. what we do know is that there has been a vicious, calculated, and despicable attack on law enforcement. police in dallas were on duty doing their jobs, keeping people safe during peaceful protests. these are enforcement officers were targeted and nearly a dozen officers were shot. five were killed. other officers and at least one civilian were wounded. some are in syria's condition and we are praying for their recovery. -- serious condition and we are praying for their recovery. as i told mayor rawlings, we are
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horrified over these events and we stand united with the people and the police department in dallas. according to police, there are multiple suspects. we will learn more undoubtedly about their twisted motivations. but let's be clear, there is no possible justification for these kinds of attacks or any violence against law enforcement. the fbi is already in touch with the dallas police, and anyone involved in these senseless murders will be held fully accountable. justice will be done. i will have more to say about this as the facts become more clear. for now, let me just say that even as yesterday i spoke about our need to be concerned as all americans about racial disparities in our criminal justice system, i also said yesterday that our police have
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an extraordinarily difficult job . in the vast majority of them do their job in outstanding fashion. amy: president obama's king and water -- for some earlier this morning. as news about the dallas shooting unfolded, former illinois congressman joe walsh sparked controversy by declaring a war against president obama and black lives matter activists. around 9:00 bm last night, walsh tweeted -- "3 dallas cops killed. 7 wounded. this is now war. watch out obama. watch out black lives matter punks. real america is coming after you." he later deleted the tweet. this comes as many commentators are inaccurately claiming there has been a rise in violence against police officers under the obama administration. in reality, the opposite is true. during the first seven years of obama's presidency, an average of 54 officers were shot and killed. that's less than the average of officers killed each year under george w. bush, bill clinton, george h.w. bush, ronald reagan
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and gerald ford. , in fact, the safest two years for police officers over the last century were during the obama presidency. the years 2013 and 2015, which also coincided with the rise of the black lives matter movement. we begin today's show with two guests. graham weatherspoon is a retired detective with the new york city police department. he's also a board member of the amadou diallo foundation. us marc lamont hill rejoins from morehouse college in atlanta. yes just written a new book called "nobody: casualties of america's war on the vulnerable from ferguson to flint and beyond." we welcome you both to democracy now! graham weatherspoon, let's begin with you. your reaction to the four that unfolded last night, carrying on for hours and dallas, just as this peaceful anti-police brutality protest was wrapping up, snipers opening fire on
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dallas police. >> the last three days have been mbing in this country. we are at a pivotal apex in terms of where this country is heading and where it will wind up very shortly. casketsarried the during my tenure. i have stood over people that i knew laying on the ground. my partner was shot in the face and i've had people try to kill me numerous times. but what we saw last night, and i'm did not know this until i woke up this morning around 6:00, it took me back to a conversation i had with ray kelly of years ago and i said, do you want urban warfare in this city of new york? because people had come to me years ago after amadou had been killed -- and these were asked military personnel. they said they were tired of it.
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they said, we're going to start killing these cops. i said, that is not a good thing to discuss. but it is a reality. who --re people out here and we have seen a just any political spectrum over the last few months with comments that people have made and just the fanning of the flames. we now know that whoever these individuals were, and i had said this to ray kelly, a bullet-proof vest is not going to protect the police officer, not from someone who is using a high-powered weapon. so, and for sure, it has come to pass, not here in new york but in dallas, and i. never happens here, but there are people out there who are not operating on all cylinders, who have weapons. in the military, told me some years ago that they were weeding men out of the military who were part of the
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white supremacist movement, and there are joining the military just to get the training. there are a lot of things going on in the back, and the general public doesn't have a general -- doesn't have an idea of what is happening. so the fbi and jag and other units were trying to figure who they were to pull them out of the military so they could not get that type of training. but you look at the situation last night. a peaceful demonstration you into total- erupts chaos. i did an interview yesterday and i said, we cannot afford to move with the eye for an eye mentality. innocent people wind up dead on both sides. we see this in iraq right now with these insane bombings going on. we have seen it in palestine between the jews and the palestinians. nobody wins.
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there has to be a time when we come to the table to truly address the issue of race in this country. it is a cancer that has polluted not just this country, but the world. and until we choose to come and sit down and talk, number one, i believe that most americans live in two states in this country. the state of denial in the state of fear. amy: marc lamont hill. >> we have to address the question of race, no doubt, but also power. everyday citizens don't have people footing with the state in order to battle the estate. is in a position of power and one as an occupying force, one is not. the same with law enforcement. one is an occupying force and one is not. i also want to be careful that we don't link what happened last night to the black lives matter
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movement -- resistance movement. i know you're not doing that, but that is in the instant, easy media narrative. that is very dangerous. amy: i found them watching the coverage of the horror that took place last night, people saying, look at what happens, protesting police and they are killed. protesting the police or is it a peace movement? there's no contradiction in the being a police officers and men being stopped for their taillight being out. >> i would argue any radical or progressive movement is driven by humanistic principles. i have worked with, marched with, studied and covered the black lives matter movement and antistate violence activists all around the country for the last two years. not once has the question of shooting police come up. when we go to these rallies and we see people causing problems, we try to weed them out.
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and ferguson, the biggest problem was extremist would come in and try to kind of colonized the movement and turn it into something it is not. the black lives matter folks on twitter today, provide a sense of dignity and peace and purpose. we want to end violence against the state. inton't want to turn killers, we want to stop the practice of killings. we don't think the state has the moral authority to kill us, and we don't want to go around killing cops. even if there were an outlier who somehow was self identified as an activist and they shot a police officer, that is not a reflection on the movement or our principles anymore than the klan members are a reflection of the tea party. that is not the organizing principle of the movement and selling out the case for black lives matter were these other antiviral its movements. amy: the video of one of the snipers last night -- i mean, so packed with ammunition it was falling out of his pocket -- the commentary around he was dancing polend the cement
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targeting police, that he is some type of military training. >> no doubt. what he was doing tactically suggest some sort of military training. this is not just a rogue killer. this is not your everyday garden-variety shooter. this is someone who had training. at that could be a range of things. i don't want to speculate, but that is what we need to find out. it would probably be a bizarre stretch of logic to assume this is some random activist who decided to go on a cop killing spree. that is not what we do. amy: the image of the police officers lined up black, white at the parkland hospital, the hospital where john f. kennedy was brought, was quite stunning this morning. >> it was incredibly stunning. it speaks to who we are as human beings when we see people die, when we see children lose family members. all of this is a profound
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tragedy and we should respond as a profound tragedy. what we cannot do is conflate two very different things. on the one hand, there are five officers who died, six more in critical condition. them.y for i want them to be ok. but i cannot allow that to detour me from a principled critique of state violence. far more people have died at the hands of law enforcement this year than died as law-enforcement officers. i am not having an oppression derby -- amy: and more died this year than last. >> and sensitive to the loss of life. i am profoundly sad about what happened. it is a tragedy. but that cannot stop us from doing the work we need to do in fighting for justice against a violence. amy: this issue of guns. president obama said from warsaw, we also know when people are armed with powerful weapons, fortunately, it makes attacks like these more deadly and more tragic. you are a former cop, a former detective.
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what about this, the high-powered weapons they had? >> there is no need for people to have high-powered weapons. they are not hunting. those are assault weapons. they are used for combat situations. they are not to protect your home, necessarily. i am not against people having a handgun legally, but we have to understand in this country, money motivates a lot of things. unfortunately, money is the god of this country. so as money is generated, politicians respond one way or the other. we have no need for assault rifles. orre not hunting bear or elk anything else. those days are long gone in this country. 250 years ago. that is that the time we're living in now. there is no need for people to ammo..62 nato rounds, 223
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that is high velocity ammo. you are not simply protecting your self. you are out there with a high-capacity magazine. you are out there taking people. you are a killer. you are a killer. yes, people like to go and shoot and target practice. that is great. but there is a limit to everything. my pastor says, anything to the extreme becomes error. so it is best to stay, if we can, near the middle. but these weapons? ak-47's and such? there is no need for them. amy: we're going to go to break and come back to this discussion. we will stay with graham weatherspoon retired detective , with the new york city police department. of,marc lamont hill, author "nobody: casualties of america's war on the vulnerable, from ferguson to flint and beyond." but we're going to baton rouge, louisiana, where we will be joined by the head of the naacp, michael mcclanahan.
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altonl be talking about sterling and what is coming next. stay with us. ♪ [music break]
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amy: this is democracy now!, democracynow.org, the war and peace report. i'm amy goodman. in baton rouge, louisiana, protests and visuals are continuing for fourth day following the death of alton sterling who was fatally shot by police early tuesday morning. sterling was a 37-year-old african american father of five. the two officers involved in his death are both white. bystander video shows sterling was tended to the ground by two white police officers. one of the officers then shoots sterling at least twice. the audio than captures the sound of multiple additional gunshots.
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persong is at least a 38 killed by louisiana police since 2015. the justice department has announced it will investigate the killing which has sparked two days a protest. president obama addressed the alton sterling and philando castile. pres. obama: when incidents like this occur, there is a big chunk of our fellow citizenry that because of the color of their skin, their not being treated the same. and that hurts. and that should trouble all of us. issue. not just a black it is not just a hispanic issue. this is an american issue that we should all care about. all fair-minded people should be concerned.
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amy: joining us now from baton rouge, louisiana, michael mcclanahan president of the , baton rouge branch of the naacp. still with us, graham weatherspoon retired detective with the new york city police department. and marc lamont hill, author of "nobody: casualties of america's war on the vulnerable, from ferguson to flint and beyond." michael mcclanahan, thank you for joining us. i saw you first on tv at the news conference where people had gathered to decry the killing of alton sterling. can you talk about what you understand happened and what you're calling for right now? what happened on tuesday? >> good morning and thank you for having me on. as i appreciate what happened with -- what alton sterling was doing, what a lot of young brothers do, entrepreneurs, sell cd's, what we call hustle work, to provide for their families. he had been doing a for a long time. while there, i understand the
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police department, dispatch received a call that the gentleman, alton, was brandishing a gun. they came on the scene within a few minutes of arriving on the scene, they taste, jumped on, and shot this gentleman without giving him a reason why they were stopping him, without doing in of the training that i have known them to do in terms of where you confront the community. happened, you has see many in the community coming out saying, "that had happened to me. i was accosted. i was unlawfully detained and beat up." this is years of frustration, fear. thatur guests said, denial this does not happen. amy: the police say a call came in just after midnight.
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they now have identified a homeless and who made this call who said alton sterling had a gun. you are allowed to have a gun in louisiana, right? open carry laws. carry are allowed to weapon. i don't know to the extent that he had a weapon. but clearly, if the police officers in their training dictated they were going to arrive on the scene which a weapon may have been involved, there are certain things they are trained to do from what i gather, from looking at the video, none of that took place. amy: what are you calling for now, michael mcclanahan? thehere is a coulter in baton rouge police department that has allowed this type of action to happen for years, for decades. i am calling for this culture to be rooted out. that means police officers who conduct this type of action need to be brought to justice on
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other cases. i call for the mayor to step down and for the police chief to resign because the mayor appoints the police chief, really controls the police chief. the police chief is a good friend of mine. but friendship in this type of business has to step aside for the people's business, which is more important. i'm asking those involved, the police chief in the mayor, to resign. so others can come in and root out this evil, root out the 1% of that police officers that cause these types of harms in our community to be pushed to the side, to be kicked out of the department and those to serve and protect to get about the business of serving and protecting. amy: what do you think should happen to the police officers who killed alton sterling? >> i am glad you asked because anyone who commits a crime -- anyone who commits an act such as the act they committed, would
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be arrested, put in jail, and the process of justice would take place. these officers should not get a free pass. they should be arrested. they should be charged and let the system work. if it works for some, it should work for all. no one should be exempt from the system. amy: what about that, marc lamont hill? i also want to ask former police officer graham weatherspoon about arresting officers. >> you know, i come out of a prison abolitionist system. my long-term vision is not tied to massacre is a ration, not tied to cajun people, but tied to things that are restorative. context, said, in this police cannot be above a system. see time after time after time that when law enforcement
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kills us, nothing happens. if it is on tape, nothing happens. if it is not on tape, nothing happens. at some point, when he to engage in transparency and distance. that means civilian review boards, some kind of mechanism to police the police to oversee the police to make sure that they get brought to justice in the same way citizens do. amy: graham weatherspoon? >> yes, i have worked on cases where i have investigated police officers. i have no problem sending them to present for the crimes they have committed. officers,not police they were criminals. nobody is above the law. when a police department fails thelean house, it minimizes possibility of good police committed relations. we have to have a transparent process where citizen and police officer are held to the same standards. a police officer should be held to a higher standard.
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when i enter the transit police department or the some odd years ago, they had a statute that says, if you were married and engaged in the marital affair, you were terminated. -- that is that the standard now. >> it was probably never enforced -- >> no, it was in force. i know people who were terminated. but he police officer has to be held to a higher standard. you could not the excuse, "i was afraid." if you are a freight, stay home with mommy. this is not a job for people who are scared. everyone goes out and what's to come home at the end of the day. the life of a police officer is no more valuable than the life of the citizen. amy: men responsible for the death of alton sterling were police officers blame salamoni an officer late. do you know these police officers, michael mcclanahan?
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>> i do not know them, but i know one of the fellows, i know his family. i'm aware of his family, aware of his history. but you are right, to speak to your guest's comment, officers are trained. there are certain things they are trained to do that ordinary citizens don't know. they are trained. they are always trained. updated training, retraining. if you leave home with the intent to commit crime, a heinous act, you're no longer a police officer, you're a criminal. as such, you need to be treated as such. thursday in minnesota, thousands of people attended vigils for philando castile. a massive crowd gathered outside the montessori school where he had worked. for the second in a row, another crowd gathered outside the governor's mansion in st. paul where castille's girlfriend
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spoke out. she is the woman who live streamed the aftermath of her boyfriends shooting while she was still in the car with a police officer pointing a gun at her, her dying boyfriend, and her four-year-old daughter in the back seat. she narrated as her boyfriend lay dying the her. on thursday, she spoke outside the governor's mansion. >> i wanted everyone in the world to know that no matter how much the police temper with evidence, how much they stick put it onno matter -- facebook and go viral so the people could see. so the people could see. i wanted the people to determine who was right and wrong. i wanted the people to be the testimony here. a solid our eyes. the only thing you did not see was when he shot. if i had moved with that gun was out, he would have shot me. so i told to another video to go live 10 seconds before my phone
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died because i wanted everybody in the world to see what the holies do and how they roll -- police do and how they roll. i did not do it for pity. i did not do it for fame. i didn't so the world would know these police are not here to protect and serve us. they are here to assassinate us. they are here to kill us. because we are black. we don't support each other enough, so they feel like they can take us off. it is not ok. a good man, a 35-year-old man who worked for st. paul public school, never been fingerprinted or handcuffed. he has been taken away from his community. this is detrimental to everybody that is here today. not only me, myself and my daughter, but everyone in the world. . ask that we all get justice that anyone who is lost a loved one or someone dear to them, i feel for you guys. i am praying for each and every
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face i see out here tonight because no one deserves -- no one deserves this. i have not been able to sleep or eat or work. i have not been able to do anything besides hold my daughter, tell her how much of a superhero she is. because she is an angel. she knew he was gone before i knew. she said, "mom, the police are bad guys. they killed him and he is never coming back. he is never coming back." the fact that my four year old had to tell me that he was gone as i'm telling her never speak positivey, only stick things, she knew he was gone and he wasn't coming back. amy: that is dimon "lavish" reynolds, the girlfriend of philando castile, talking about her four-year-old daughter who was in t backseat. sher her boyfriend died and is told to step out of the car and walk backwards as other police officers would have their
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guns pointed at her and she is handcuffed and put in the police car, she is asking, what are you doing with my daughter? then she is put in the car next to her. as she weeps, realizing -- this is lavish -- that her boyfriend is dead. what does her little daughter say, marc? >> she is comforting her mother. "i am here for you." to watch what diamond did, lavish, in terms of sort of handling the situation, the steadiness of her hand, her ability to calmly engaged the officer who is still pointing a gun at her, to broadcast to the. entire world what has happened. amy: and she does not have her phone now, but because she livestreamed, is on facebook. >> if she does. livestreamed, there is no reason to believe that the police officer would not have destroyed that footage. she is part of a long tradition of black women who have stand up
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against a violence. we often talk about male protesters and resistance, but it is a history of women who have been courageous, who have always led us toward justice and freedom. amy: when you look at the image, graham weatherspoon, you're a former cop, a retired detective, the new york times has a spread. four images. one with the police officer having his gun pointed at lavish and her daughter and dying boyfriend and the car as she is narrating her boyfriend's death, and the picture of her, the picture of him bloodied, laying out on the front seat, and the little girl in the back. your thoughts as a police officer? >> it is very disturbing to me. why do people have to be subjugated to this kind of bevior?
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why does a four-year-old child have to sit and watch a man who has cared for her summarily done away with like he was a roach? there were laws in north carolina protecting slaves because they were chattel. men who had killed a slave on their plantation were tried and sentenced to death for killing, butchering a slave in a barn in front of the other slaves in the 1850's. their sentence was death for killing chattel. animals in this country have more rights than black people. when we were chattel, we had some protection. we are not seeing it here. you mentioned emmett till. i was thinking of emmett till as
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we were listening to the gentleman from the naacp. i did a video for "we are change" three or four years ago on videotaping the police and why people should. this is an example of why. the notion is that we are not living in a norman walk well experience -- norman rockwell experience were the boys sitting he is given and ice cream cone. but there are some cops who will .o the norman rockwell but for a four-year-old child to be sitting in a car, to see a police officer firing shots into someone -- for her to witness a murder like that? not just the fact that this man is dead. it is a psychological damage that is being done to families and family members time and time again and no one is looking at that. i speak to mothers.
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there is a 13-year-old boy in brooklyn right now whose father was murdered by a police officer in brooklyn 13 years ago and that police officer has yet to face charges in the killing of carlos lopez. his son is suffering from depression because his father died a couple of months before he was born. he doesn't even know who his father was and his father was not even committing a crime when he was murdered. but it was covered up by charles hynes and the police department. the people are living and they have to live with these traumatic episodes, and it is not -- that is not even being addressed. forwarde as a people go , whether we are black people, white people -- how do we as a nation go forward when we can see innocent people damaged? and it is virtually a news clip for the week until there is another episode.
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to: we're going to come back this discussion as we break. you are listening, watching graham weatherspoon, a former police detective, also was a patrolman on the streets for many years. also our guest, marc lamont hill , the author of, "nobody: casualties of america's war on the vulnerable, from ferguson to flint and beyond." and joining us still from baton rouge, and he will stay with us for the hour, michael mcclanahan , president of the baton rouge aa cp. we are also going to hear from people on the streets of new york by people around the country last night was a night of protest. it was also a night of horror in dallas as five police officers were gunned down, six severely injured, and we will get the latest on that as well. stay with us. ♪ [music break]
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amy: this is democracy now!, democracynow.org, the war and peace report. i'm amy goodman. protests against police brutality spread across the country in the wake of the federal police killings of african-american men alton castile.and philando in oakland, california, more than 1000 people blocked interstate 880 for hours, hundreds more marched in denver, philadelphia, washington, d.c., elena, baton rouge. more than 40 arrested and is a massive march in new york city. -- in a massive march in new york city. democracy now! spoke with some of the protesters. >> i am here marching for justice. it is disgusting because i know it is a cycle that is going to
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happen and there is clear evidence of cold-blooded slaughtered murder. there's that thing left to do except act. it is time to protest and take access. i want to change the system and the correctness behind it. so starting with an indictment, starting with the trial, starting with the investigation and punishing these murderers for murdering people. i'm here because we need a change. we need a change. i work with the youth. this can be one of because i work with, one of my loved ones. it is happening way too much. we need to change now. we're demanding freedom and change and amending that someone has to pay penalty. we need justice. we need repercussion so when this happens, it can stop happening is such a rapidly rate. -- we need getting
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some kind of law set in stone for the cops when this is happening so they have some kind of price to pay. that is why i am here and what i'd imagine. i am here because, one can i educate a lot of boys. ina mother of boys. three, my student from marley graham was murdered. i've never stopped. he was murdered by nypd going into his house. that, too, was justified. they always find justification. around two hours after the murder of alton was leaked, i posted on facebook that they are now going to speak as to why it was justified, as to why he was murdered. we're demanding that individuals who conduct themselves criminally are charged like criminals. so police officers need to get charged like terminals. >> i am here because these are
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our streets. >> black lives matter! treatment off the americans by police officers, there is no need for you to shoot a man who was on the ground with his hands to his side six times. it is unnecessary force. i think it is something heavy on our shoulders and we feel helpless. i asked police officers that better training, evaluate them mentally, and don't have people on the streets just waiting for an opportunity to pull the trigger. i am sick of waking up and seeing another black man or person of color killed were gunned down by the hands of law enforcement or in police custody , and with no explanation. i can't handle anymore. i woke up this morning and said, didn't we just do this yesterday?
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i called my mom and i just started crying because the feeling of helplessness that i woke up this morning was unbearable. managedeen said, they to disarm and not kill white people all the time. you look at the footage and it is like, these people had to die? you could not disarm or handled the situation in another instance? i am demanding we get better treatment -- get treatment that every other person gets, especially white people. amy: the voices of protesters in new york city last night. a massive march going on fifth avenue. goese michael mcclanahan off to a news conference, president of the baton rouge naacp him a speaking to us from the louisiana pbs studios, your thoughts as you listen to people in new york and here people
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across the country speaking out for alton sterling, for philando castile, and also, i have not asked you yet about what took place in dallas and the killing of the police officers. your thoughts? , you areand foremost speaking to years of frustration. speaking to years of being segregated. they are speaking to years of being separated. they are seeing loved ones -- innocent persons being killed, being beat up, being brutalized at the hands of those that were charged to serve and protect. so what you're having now is frustration. at some point in time, it will iraq beyond just being -- erupt beyond just being frustrated. saying theyung lady
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find justification for what they do. they have a handbook and manual that we must get into and change. based upon that handbook and manual, they said they did what they were supposed to do and trained to do. that manual probably took place in 1900. it is 2016. it is time for that manual to be changed. it is time for the citizens to sit on the review board that makes these manuals and handbooks. it is time for common people to come and be a part of the total process, not just the process at the end of a gun or sit as a witness for a loved one. also, we speak nonviolence. the naacp has been around for over 100 years. we practice nonviolence because we believe love will only out run -- get rid of hate. we believe light gets rid of darkness. what we want to do is shine light in dark places. there are only a few bad apples in the world.
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only a few. we must expose the few to get rid of them in our society. because it takes a few to make a whole lot bad. we're going to continue to fight. let the people a baton rouge to we are not going to let this go away easily. we're going to continue to demand justice done only for alton, for all the others that came before him and all the others that may come after him. we're going to continue to fight and demand justice and i'm going to pray that someone in the system has the backbone to get up and go and arrest them thugs called police officers and put them in jail. we are going to pray that not another family is being separated, not another child is -- is raised without apparent, without a father. amy: michael mcclanahan, i want to thank you for much for joining us, and get comments from marc lamont hill. all of the news is rolling in as
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we end the broadcast. an update from dallas, the city's police chief has just said the dallas shooter was working alone and wanted to "kill white officers." authorities have not released the name of the suspected shooter who died after the ambush. your thoughts? >> my sources were sort of telling me that and i began to wonder what that would mean in the big picture. obviously, to me, whoever did it, i was not concerned with their razor anything like that, but we need to make sure we don't conflate one person with a movement. they are two separate things. this person clearly has mental health issues, lily has some sort of issue that needs to be understood. we cannot link that individual to this movement. there is been a lot of long, hard work being done and we cannot be derailed. amy: marc lamont hill and graham weatherspoon, thank you for being with us. that doesn't for our broadcast. democracy now! is looking for feedback from people who appreciate the closed captioning.
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e-mail your comments to outreach@democracynow.org or mail them to democracy now! p.o. box 693 new york, new york 10013. [captioning made possible by democracy now!]
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